Arizona Advanced Medicine Clinic

Cancer Projected To Rise By 75% By the Year 2030

Did you ever wonder why all of a sudden we see such a big push for “cancer centers” - Cancer Centers of America, Banner Good Samaritan Cancer Center, St. Joseph’s Hospital Cancer Center - and it’s the same all over the country.

McDonald’s always does demographics studies before they open a new facility - so does Starbucks. I would imagine that those who are in charge of building and expanding hospital facilities do the same thing.

So what do they know that the rest of us are still unaware of?

We know that we are seeing more cancer in family members and friends. We are told in the literature that it’s because we are diagnosing cancer earlier, therefore we have a better chance of treating it.

What about the cancer-infection link? What we are ever told is reflected in the headline of an article from the Associated Press posted Friday June 1st, 2012: “Global cancer cases could rise 75% by 2030“.

The article states: “Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis B and C viruses, and human papillomaviruses were responsible for 1.9 million cases, mainly gastric, liver, and cervix uteri cancers.”[1]

The CDC has already recommended that the entire Baby Boomer generation be screened for Hepatitis C.[2]

H pylori is something very easy to screen for. At the Arizona Center for Advanced Medicine, we use a test that measures the DNA signature of this bacterium in the stool, as part of our work-up for gastro-intestinal problems like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or colitis.

What we are also not told is that most cancer is preventable.

That’s right, most cancer is preventable.

So why don’t we read about prevention in the newspapers and in the scientific literature?

Jill Jouret, in The Lancet, writes: “Commercial companies and marketing agencies are well acquainted with the power of mass media to shape attitudes and drive behaviours... Governments and other civic bodies have often sought to harness this power to guide health-related behaviours-to prevent disease and prolong and improve quality of life. Participation in vaccination, cancer screening, and tobacco cessation programmes has been encouraged by media campaigns for years.”

And how is that working out for us? The incidence of cancer continues to rise.

Perhaps we are barking up the wrong tree - or maybe we are mistaking the trees in a park for the forest.

Remember that we (humans) are a chaotic system. Everything that we do impacts every other aspect of our being. Our choice of homes... relationships... foods... drugs... lifestyle…

We can certainly modify at least some of those things towards a more healthy pattern, thereby decreasing our chances of developing cancer in our lifetimes.

The choice is ours.


[1] de Martel C, Ferlay J et al. Global burden of cancers attributable to infections in 2008: a review and synthetic analysis. Lancet Oncol. 2012 Jun;13(6):607-15. Epub 2012 May 9. [2] http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/docs/HCV-TestingFactSheetNoEmbargo508.pdf

The CDC has already recommended that the entire Baby Boomer generation be screened for Hepatitis C.[2]

H pylori is something very easy to screen for. At the Arizona Center for Advanced Medicine, we use a test that measures the DNA signature of this bacterium in the stool, as part of our work-up for gastro-intestinal problems like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or colitis.

What we are also not told is that most cancer is preventable.

That’s right, most cancer is preventable.

So why don’t we read about prevention in the newspapers and in the scientific literature?

Jill Jouret, in The Lancet, writes: “Commercial companies and marketing agencies are well acquainted with the power of mass media to shape attitudes and drive behaviours... Governments and other civic bodies have often sought to harness this power to guide health-related behaviours-to prevent disease and prolong and improve quality of life. Participation in vaccination, cancer screening, and tobacco cessation programmes has been encouraged by media campaigns for years.”

And how is that working out for us? The incidence of cancer continues to rise.

Perhaps we are barking up the wrong tree - or maybe we are mistaking the trees in a park for the forest.

Remember that we (humans) are a chaotic system. Everything that we do impacts every other aspect of our being. Our choice of homes... relationships... foods... drugs... lifestyle…

We can certainly modify at least some of those things towards a more healthy pattern, thereby decreasing our chances of developing cancer in our lifetimes.

The choice is ours.


[1] de Martel C, Ferlay J et al. Global burden of cancers attributable to infections in 2008: a review and synthetic analysis. Lancet Oncol. 2012 Jun;13(6):607-15. Epub 2012 May 9.

H pylori is something very easy to screen for. At the Arizona Center for Advanced Medicine, we use a test that measures the DNA signature of this bacterium in the stool, as part of our work-up for gastro-intestinal problems like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or colitis.

What we are also not told is that most cancer is preventable.

That’s right, most cancer is preventable.

So why don’t we read about prevention in the newspapers and in the scientific literature?

Jill Jouret, in The Lancet, writes: “Commercial companies and marketing agencies are well acquainted with the power of mass media to shape attitudes and drive behaviours... Governments and other civic bodies have often sought to harness this power to guide health-related behaviours-to prevent disease and prolong and improve quality of life. Participation in vaccination, cancer screening, and tobacco cessation programmes has been encouraged by media campaigns for years.”

And how is that working out for us? The incidence of cancer continues to rise.

Perhaps we are barking up the wrong tree - or maybe we are mistaking the trees in a park for the forest.

Remember that we (humans) are a chaotic system. Everything that we do impacts every other aspect of our being. Our choice of homes... relationships... foods... drugs... lifestyle…

We can certainly modify at least some of those things towards a more healthy pattern, thereby decreasing our chances of developing cancer in our lifetimes.

The choice is ours.

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